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As a graduate of the Air Force Academy, the following is especially poignant to me.  I have great respect for the graduates from West Point, the Air Force Academy and Annapolis.  This graduate of West Point gives an excellent perspective regarding our veterans.

Thank a Veteran on Veteran’s Day, November 11. Each and every one deserves it.

Thank You

Thank You

I remember the day I found out I got into West Point.  My Mom actually

showed up in the hallway of my high school and waited for me to get out

of class.

She was bawling her eyes out and apologizing that she had opened up my

admission letter.  She wasn’t crying because it had been her dream for

me to go there.  She was crying because she knew how hard I’d worked to

get in, how much I wanted to attend, and how much I wanted to be an

infantry officer.

I was going to get that opportunity.  That same day two of my teachers

took me aside and essentially told me the following: “David, you’re a smart guy.

You don’t have to join the military.  You should go to college, instead.”

I could easily write a theme defending West Point and the military as I

did that day, explaining that United States Military Academy is an

elite institution, that separate from that, it is actually statistically much

harder to enlist in the military than it is to get admitted to college, that

serving the nation is a challenge that all able-bodied men should at least

consider for a host of reasons, but I won’t.

What I will say is that when a 16 year-old kid is being told that

attending West Point is going to be bad for his future then there is a

dangerous disconnect in America, and entirely too many Americans have

no idea what kind of burdens our military is bearing.

In World War II, 11.2% of the nation’s population served for four (4)

years.

During the Vietnam era, 4.3% of the nation’s population served in

twelve (12) years.

Since 2001, only 0.45% of our population has served in the Global War

on Terror.

These are unbelievable statistics.  Over time, fewer and fewer people

have shouldered more and more of the burden and it is only getting

worse.

Our troops were sent to war in Iraq by a Congress consisting of 10%

veterans with only one person having a child in the military.  Taxes

did not increase to pay for the war.  War bonds were not sold.  Gas was

not regulated.  In fact, the average citizen was asked to sacrifice

nothing, and has sacrificed nothing unless they have chosen to out  of

the goodness of their hearts.

The only people who have sacrificed are the veterans and their

families.  The volunteers.  The people who swore an oath to defend this

nation.  You stand there, deployment after deployment and fight on.

You’ve lost relationships, spent years of your lives in extreme

conditions, years apart from kids you’ll never get back, and beaten

your body in a way that even professional athletes don’t understand.

Then you come home to a nation that doesn’t understand.  They don’t

understand suffering.  They don’t understand sacrifice.  They don’t

understand why we fight for them.  They don’t understand that bad

people exist.  They look at you like you’re a machine – like something

is wrong with you.  You are the misguided one – not them.

When you get out, you sit in the college classrooms with political

science teachers that discount your opinions on Iraq and Afghanistan

because YOU WERE THERE and can’t understand the macro issues they

gathered from books, because of your bias.

You watch TV shows where every vet has PTSD and the violent strain at

that.  Your Congress is debating your benefits, your retirement, and

your pay, while they ask you to do more.  But, the amazing thing about

you is that you all know this.  You know your country will never pay

back what you’ve given up.  You know that the populace at large will

never truly understand or appreciate what you have done for them.

Hell, you know that in some circles, you will be thought as less than

normal for having worn the uniform.  But you do it anyway.

You do what the greatest men and women of this country have done since 1775

YOU SERVED.  Just that decision alone makes you part of an elite group.

“Never in the field of human conflict has so much been owed by so many

to so few.” -Winston Churchill

Thank you to the 11.2% and 4.3% who have served and thanks to the

0.45% who continue to serve our Nation.

 

- This was first attributed to General David Petraeus, West Point Class of ’74.  According to the comment send by my Academy Roommate, the actual author was Nick Palmisciano, co owner of Ranger Up, a very interesting web page.

“Man is the only animal that laughs and weeps; for he is the only animal that is struck with the difference between what things are, and what they could be.”  –  William Hazlit.

I’ll just come out and say it:  Political Correctness and self-victimization or victimhood have killed humor in America, maybe the world.  We have become too self centered, too power-hungry and too serious.

When I was newly out of the Air Force and was working as a sales engineer at a steel fabrication company, we saw sales people almost every day.  Some sold steel, other nuts and bolts.  There were welding equipment suppliers and gas suppliers.  Even our small 25 person company saw a salesman or two every day.  What did they have in common?  Most brought donuts or pizza or cookies and most had a joke to tell.

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from Resist.com

from Resist.com

Today, the chances of getting a joke from a salesperson are zero.  Everyone is afraid of whom they might offend.  We are too sensitive, too easily offended – looking for ways to play the ‘victim card’.

I blame those who seek power through the use of the victim ploy.  Many call it the race card, but it is just as commonly the religion card or the lifestyle card.  We are all being played by those who want more:  More power, more money, more titles, just more of everything.  And to get it they use the victim ploy.  “You are hateful because you tell a Jewish joke or a Polish joke or a fat-boy joke.”  Really?  Does that mean I hate Jews or Poles or Fat people because I tell a joke about them?

Shecky Green and Henny Youngman were Jewish funny-men.  The majority of their jokes were Jewish jokes.  did that make them “Jew-haters” or did they do that because they had the capacity to make fun of themselves – a valuable tool to overcome many of life’s hurdles.

Examples:

“Why do Jewish men die before their wives?  They want to.”

“There is a big controversy on the Jewish view of when life begins.  In Jewish tradition, the fetus is not considered viable until it graduates from law school.”

Is this hate?  Of course not, nor is most humor that makes fun of any group.  It is making light of the serious things in life so they are more bearable.

So the next time someone calls you a ‘hater’ for telling a joke, tell them to lighten up.  Don’t let them play you like we have been played by politicians over the past few decades.  They just want power and this is their favorite tool.

William Hazlit again – “The love of liberty is the love of others; the love of power is the love of ourselves.”

My college roommate responded to the Dance Video with the best comment of the year:

“Thanks for the respite from current reality. I felt a strong emotional connection throughout to our beautiful human race and the good things we can do. The video shows us that dance and music are universal human needs that bring us joy and pleasure as individuals and as part of a group.

But how ironic that one of the video locations was Erbil, Iraq, where today hateful and violent Islamofacists are raping and killing the people, including perhaps those in this video, because they want to think and live differently and will not submit to Islam.

I hope our truly wonderful nation built by people from all corners of the eath “yearning to be free” will lead the LIBERAL (in the original sense of the word) nations of the world in opposing and expunging this hideous Islamofacist cancer that seeks to obliterate the natural human rights of all people. We must find the strength to protect our way of life using all the economic, political and military tools we have–without mercy or moderation. And we must stop telling these vile vermin, wherever they are in the world, that they don’t have to worry about being sent to Allah by US “boots on the ground.”

Thank you Mark!

There is enough sadness, enough fighting, enough bad news.  How about a brief break from all that with something truly beautiful?

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- Beautifully created and crafted by Matt Harding and Melissa Nixon

This Monday we celebrate Memorial Day.  Each year we set aside one day to remember the men and women who gave their lives in the service of their country.  With its roots in the aftermath of the Civil War, the idea was to remember, or more correctly put, not to forget those who gave the greatest sacrifice that we might remain free.

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thanks to the Napa Valley  register-Jorgen Gulliksen

Thanks to the Napa Valley
Register-Jorgen Gulliksen

The secession of the Southern States from the Union was precipitated in large part by cultural differences between the North and South, principal among those being the issue of Slavery.  Over two years into the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation freeing all slaves in the then 10 Confederate States.  Many believe he did this to free up more conscripts who could join the North in the war.  Over 600,000 people died in the Civil War changing the lives of most families on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line.  The cultural impact of memorializing that many people led to a day to remember all who have died in service to our country.

Most historians believe that the key issue for which the South Seceded was States Rights as outlined in the Constitution.  The South believed that the issue of slavery was left by the Constitution to the States to decide.  In any event, the two long-lasting results of the Civil War were the continued union of all the states and the ending of slavery as it was then practiced.  Since the Civil War, our nation has remained free through the efforts and lives of hundreds of thousands who fought and died in two World Wars, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, and Afghanistan among others.

So Memorial Day’s roots lie in the hope that we should remember those who died to keep us free.  For descendants of slaves, this should be among the most important of holidays.  For everyone who enjoys the freedoms of life in the United States, this is a day to pause and reflect.

Whoever you are, whatever your background or ancestry, the chances are that in your heritage there is a person who gave his or her life that we might remain free.  I think the least we should do on Memorial Day is to say a small prayer for those who have gone before us.  And, we should redouble our efforts to return to a Federal system that grants most rights to the States and leaves us free to do as we wish as long as we don’t injure others.

Happy Memorial Day.

Three years ago, in March of 2011, I wrote the blog post you will see below.  I guess that around tax season I spend more time thinking about all the taxes we pay and where they go and why they are so high.  This post is much as I would write it today, except that I would likely have have added the additional costs to the city of “The Affordable Care Act.”   I think when I have the time I am going to make a long list of all the things government does for us  and highlight the ones it does better today or more effectively today than it did them 10 years ago.  Here is the 2011 post:

Here is a simple example of the changes that have resulted in an increase in the cost of government without an increase in services to the tax-paying public.  To simplify, my example uses constant 2011 dollars.  This is not a bedtime story and you may want to read it slowly.  You will likely shake your head slowly when you are done reading.

It is 1975 in Hometown, Georgia.  The Public Works Department of Hometown has 2 laborers who spend the vast majority of their time repairing and maintaining sidewalks.  Their total pay and benefits (adjusted for 2011) is equivalent to $20,000 each per year or $40,000.  The tools and equipment they use were purchased at a cost amortized over 5 years of $8,000 per year. They use about $2,000 annually in materials.  So, without getting fancy, Hometown spends $50,000 a year and the city has a nice looking, well cared for sidewalk system.  The 25,000 resident tax-payers of Hometown are pleased with what they get for the $2 per capita annual expenditure on sidewalk repair/maintenance.

In 1980, the City Council decides to save money.  They let both laborers go and they contract out for sidewalk services.  They budget $40,000 for sidewalk repair and maintenance.  Seven local contractors bid on the work.  The winning contractor has added one of the ex-city employees to his contracting crew and can do the job with existing equipment.  The contractor will just have to work a bit harder and more hours, but he has incentive since this contract will increase his profit by almost $5,000 a year.  The sidewalks are equally or better maintained and the City has saved $10,000.

In Neartown, just 20 miles from Hometown, there is a big scandal in 1982.  The Public Works Director is found to have given a sewer cleaning contract to his brother-in-law for about 25% more than the contract bid at the previous year.  In response to the outcry in the neighboring town, Hometown passes a new law that all contracts over $10,000 must go out to bid.  All contractors must apply and qualify to bid.

By 1985, the Public Works Director feels overworked and begs for help in administering City Contracts.  The City hires a Contracts Administrator for $35,000 per year.  The low bid on the sidewalk repair contract for 1986 comes in at $45,000.  The increase is due to the increased costs of the paperwork needed to qualify to bid and the increased number of inspections and specifications required by the contract.  Since the contract administrator has 10 major contracts to watch, we assign $3,500 to the cost of the sidewalk repairs.  Hometown is now spending $48,500 annually.  City savings have dropped to $1,500.

In 1988, the city’s employees are organized by the SEIU and the first City Labor Contract with the SEIU is negotiated.  Since the City is a bit strapped for money, it tries to hold off on wage and salary increases, but it does allow for a large increase in benefits and pension promises.  The actual cost to the City of the Contracts Administrator (her new pay grade is Administrator III and she now qualifies for a step increase because of her 3 years of service) with all benefits is now $42,500 per year.  The new contract cost comes in at $47,500.  Add to that the 10% of $42,500 for contract administration and Hometown is now paying $51,750 annually to keep up the sidewalks.  The City now pays $1,750 more per year than before and has accrued a pension liability for the Contracts Administrator that is equal to $4,250 per year.  Fortunately, City revenues have increased as property values have gone up, and, the pension liability won’t come due for many years.

In 1990, the SEIU opens negotiations with the City on its contract with a demand for a 10% increase in pay and benefits plus a simple 7% cost of living allowance (COLA) for each year of the contract.  The SEIU claims its demands are very reasonable since 50 miles away in Atlanta the contract is approximately 15% more expensive than the contract with Hometown.  There is a protracted period of negotiation.  The SEIU members are encouraged to slow their work down to put pressure on the City.  Finally after 6 months, the contract is settled and signed.  The City accepts a 5% increase in pay and benefits and a 6% COLA for a three year contract.  Part of the deal the City had to accept included hiring of an assistant (Administrator I) for each of the five City employees rated as Administrator III and above.  The Contracts Administrator is assigned one of the Assistants, along with his $30,000 in pay and benefits.  The low bid on the sidewalk contract comes in at $51,500.  Again, contractors complained about all the new requirements, the new inspections, and the costs of increased paperwork to do the job. Ten percent of the cost of the Contracts Administrator and her Assistant now comes to $7,462.50, not counting the ever growing pension liability.  Now the city is paying $58,962.50 for sidewalk repair.  Because of the slowdown during contract negotiations, repairs and maintenance are behind schedule and sidewalks are starting to show significant wear and tear.

The City does not have the revenue to support the increased costs.  The City Council debates four choices: 1. Defer a large part of maintenance and repair of sidewalks; 2. Increase revenue through an increase in property tax; 3. Add to the sales tax; or  4. Float a City Bond of $1,000,000 to pay for a number of repair and maintenance projects around the city.  The City Council determines that the most politically viable solution is to ask the taxpayers for an increase in property tax.  The vote is very close, but the forces in favor of the tax convince enough people to vote and the tax measure passes.   Tax proponents were successful in making the argument that the extra money will help the city keep sidewalks and parks and the library, etc. in much better shape thus protecting the City’s investment in infrastructure.  Among their strongest arguments was that this very small tax will improve property values and a taxpayer would more than recover his tax dollars when he sells his house.

Each ensuing year, with the increased costs of the COLA and new pay raises granted with each new contract, the initial surplus created by added property tax goes away.  Two years after the property tax increase, the City asks for and gets a 0.5% addition to the sales tax.  Three years later the City Council needs to further defer sidewalk repair and maintenance.  It seems the addition of the second administrative assistant to help with Contracts Administration plus the increased costs of asphalt and concrete have increased costs beyond the City’s ability to pay.

By the year 2000, the City, in a move to save money, consolidates all Contracts Administration under a new Purchasing Division.  All three Contracts Administration employees now work for the new Director of Purchasing for the City (an $80,000 job plus benefits).  The Purchasing department now employs eight people.  The new department finds time to write a complete new set of purchasing guidelines, specifications, and inspection requirements.  The application form to bid on City Contracts is now an 11 page document that must be notarized to be submitted to the City.  A $50 fee for submitting a bid has been added to defer the cost of handling the paperwork.  Four bidders on the sidewalk maintenance contract decide not to bid this year because they can’t afford the paperwork overhead.  Only the two largest contractors (both from Atlanta, not Hometown) are approved to bid and not surprisingly, the new contract for 50% of the work previously done (more deferred maintenance) goes for $75,000 in 2000.  ABC Construction, the winning Sidewalk Contract bidder the previous year closes shop. One of ABC’s ex-employees gets a new job with the City as an inspector for City Contracts.  He is hired due to his experience with sidewalk repair and maintenance.  Inspectors now make $47,500 a year to start.

In 2010, the SEIU and the City almost come to blows as the combination of higher union demands and lower tax revenues would require that either the City lay off 25% of its workforce or reduce pay, benefits, and pension contributions.  The SEIU leads its members out on strike.  It lasts almost a month.  The parks are overrun with trash, sidewalks go unrepaired, the city sewage plant overflows and sends raw sewage into the river.  The strike is finally settled and the City agrees to a “modest” 2% increase in pay plus a “reduced” COLA of only 4% per year.  To pay for the higher costs, the City must do as it threatened and lay off almost 25% of City employees.  The Council is now considering the idea of the Bond Measure to raise needed revenue to meet their budget.

Don’t think this could happen?

It just did, while you were going about your daily business.

So how do we stop and then reverse this?  Any ideas?

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 330,000 times in 2013. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 14 days for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Celebrate our Veterans and what they have done to help preserve our freedoms and thank them for their service on November 11.  Below are four brief video messages that I think are appropriate for the day.  I hope you enjoy them.  And while you are at it, say thanks to a veteran on 11-11.

See my related posts here (11/18/2011),

here (11/09/2010), and,

my favorite, here (11/11/2010).

One Million Views! Wow!

One Million Views! Wow!

Hard for me to believe, but today, or at the latest, early tomorrow, this blog will have received over 1,000,000 views.

I think its time I either start posting more often or move on to something else.  What do you suggest?

I have a hard time with my ‘elevator speech’ about the Cement Trust.  For me it is one of those things that defies the simple description/explanation.  Having said that, I’ll give it a go anyway…. well not exactly an elevator speech, but a brief outline of the Cement Trust.

The Cement Trust is the brainchild of Bruce Christensen, the General manager of Cart-Away Concrete Systems in McMinnville, Oregon.  On January 12, 2010, in the area surrounding Port Au Prince, Haiti, literally thousands of buildings collapsed after a relatively mild earthquake (6.9 on the Richter Scale), killing almost 300,000 and making well over a million homeless.  Very poor quality concrete and poor construction methods produced buildings with barely enough strength to hold up their own weight, but definitely too weak to withstand the forces of the earthquake.  The people of Haiti lost all faith in structures made of concrete.  They did not trust cement based construction.

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thanks to WTNH.com

thanks to WTNH.com

Bruce started up a WordPress blog, Cement Trust, which soon had hundreds reading and commenting on his many posts.  Bruce’s purpose was to shine a light on the worldwide problem of poor quality concrete, especially in the poorest countries of the world.  Outside of the developed economies, concrete is typically mixed with shovels on the ground with almost no consistency and usually more water and less cement that is needed to make a suitable structural material.

Within months, literally hundreds of charities had ‘invaded’ Haiti and were attempting to rebuild the nation.  Though most were well meaning, they were doing little more than setting up the next disaster.  Most are mixing concrete with shovels on the ground, using too much water and too little cement in the mix and are creating the same poor quality concrete that was at the heart of the 2010 disaster.  Though many people are working on the issue individually, there is little recognition of the significance of the problem.

In places like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, building collapse is such a common event, it is treated like we treat fender-bender auto accidents.   They don’t warrant mention in the press.  India has literally dozens of building collapses involving fatalities each year.  In poor areas of the world, human life is not as valued as in the developed nations and living with dangerous structures seems just natural, part of life (and death).

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from livedifferent.com

from livedifferent.com

It is interesting that Concrete is the second most used commodity on earth, after water, and yet almost no one gives it a second thought.  Some cities have raging debates about whether or not to flouridate water.  Drinking water quality is a major concern in much of Africa and literally dozens of major non-profits are addressing the issue.  However, do an internet search for non-profits working to rid the world of poor quality concrete and you will likely find none.

Bruce had talked with hundreds of concerned individuals and many concerned companies, and agencies over the past three years and determined that what was needed now was some action.  Early this year he began the planning for the Cement Trust Symposium, a meeting of thought leaders on the subject who would plot a course of action determined to cure the world’s poorest concrete.

My bet is that you knew little about this problem.  I hope to post the results of the symposium within a couple of weeks.  It was a two day gathering of some of the brightest and most committed people you could ever meet and I think a plan is evolving from it that will make it possible to: “Improve the Quality of Cement-based Products in Developing Countries” (the Cement Trust Mission as developed at the Symposium).

Follow this blog for more on this.

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